A Good Year for TEFL...

A Good Year for TEFL...


 

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Why a TEFL Course is a Good Idea in 2021

 

2021 is a great year to be making changes and starting fresh! After life felt a bit like it was on hold last year, this is a great time to pursue a new goal and start moving forward again. Here are a few reasons why taking a TEFL course could be a great move for you this year.

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1)      Now is the time to invest in yourself and your career: You may be in a moment of transition as a result of our current state of pandemic-recovery. Maybe you are changing jobs or starting to think about it. Take this moment of upheaval as an opportunity to make an investment in your career and a purposeful step towards something you are interested in.

 

2)      This is the time to try something new: There has been a lot about the last 12 months that has been unexpected. For me personally, I was reminded that life is unpredictable, and there is no guarantee what the world will be like even a few weeks from now! Maybe I err a bit on the dramatic side, but this reality check really reminded me that there was no time like the present to do something new or try something I’ve been waffling over. If you’re thinking about a TEFL course, why not now?

 

3)      A TEFL certificate doesn’t expire: Not sure if you’re ready to make the leap to teaching English? Or maybe you’re waiting for a moment when an international move is a bit more feasible? No problem! A TEFL certificate doesn’t expire, so if you choose to attend the training now, you won’t lose any time if this isn’t the right time for you to move abroad long-term.

 

4)      You are certified to teach abroad or online: English language schools are still alive and kicking, here in Italy, and around the world! But if you want to get your feet wet before searching for a position in person, you can pursue teaching online, an area of the EFL field that has boomed this year. Your Via Lingua certificate is valid in both settings.

 

5)      Via Lingua’s TEFL certificate is recognized worldwide: You don’t have to change certificates or get additional training if you envision yourself moving around to different countries! Or if you’re teaching online, you may have students of all different nationalities. Your TEFL certificate is recognized globally.

 

6)      Bang for your buck: Taking a course is no small investment. But what you get out of a Via Lingua TEFL course is worth every penny. Our month-long intensive courses are 120 hours of instruction, which is just about as full as a semester-long course at a university. Not only will you get to enjoy small, interactive class sizes and accessible trainers, but you will have the chance to practice your teaching method and get instant feedback on your progress.

 

7)      You won’t know if you don’t try: In the end, are you still on the fence about TEFL? Even with all of these reasons, and more, there is no way to know if teaching EFL is for you unless you give it a go. Taking a course at Via Lingua isn’t only about learning how to teach English, but it is also a chance to reflect and learn about yourself. Maybe you’ll discover you love it!

 

8)      Attractive addition for any CV: I personally don’t think that any career lasts forever. We change and the world changes. Every job and experience we have is informative about who we are, what we like, and what we are good at. Even if teaching English doesn’t turn out to be your thing in the long-run, it is an eye-opening experience regardless. By getting out of your comfort zone and working with people of nationalities other than yours, you will learn a lot about the world and yourself, about other cultures as well as your own through another lens. After you have had your TEFL experience, your certification and experiences will be additional talking points on your CV and qualities that could differentiate you from other candidates wherever the next phase of your career takes you.

 


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